Steps to Buying a Home

The Home Buying Process

Buying Land for Your Manufactured Home

If you plan to buy land, there are several matters to consider. Your retailer or a licensed real estate agent can help you with the following concerns:

Zoning. In cities and suburban areas, and in some semi-rural areas, you may face zoning requirements or restrictions. Some areas may prohibit manufactured homes. Others may have requirements regarding their size and appearance. Contact your retailer and your planning and zoning office for more information.

Restrictive Covenants. These are limitations in property deeds that control how the land can be used. Covenants may mandate that homes be a certain size or that land be used for certain purposes. The title search, conducted when you buy the land, may outline these limitations. However, the restrictions are sometimes described in ways that are difficult to understand. You may want to seek the advice of an experienced real estate attorney to avoid problems.

Utilities. Although a manufactured home comes with plumbing, electrical and heating systems, it must be connected to utilities. Contact your local public utility companies for connection and cost information.

Water. Not all areas have local water lines and you may have to drill a well. Check with a local well-drilling company about costs and whether success is guaranteed, as success rates are less than perfect. Also, check with local health officials about water quality.

Septic. Some areas rely on septic systems rather than city or county sanitary sewerage systems. If you can't connect your home to a municipal or county system, you must check with local authorities about installing a septic tank. While properly installed septic systems can work quite well, in some cases environmental conditions may prevent their use. For more information, contact your local health department or the office responsible for issuing building permits.